Children Ages 5 to 11 Receive COVID-19 Vaccine at Children’s National Hospital

Children's National Hospital vaccine rollout
Children’s National Hospital gives its first vaccines for children ages 5 to 11 on Wednesday, Nov. 3. | Photo: Children’s National Hospital.

 

Children’s National Hospital on Wednesday, Nov. 3, gave its first round of COVID-19 vaccines to children ages 5 to 11 in the Washington, D.C. region.

These vaccinations came just hours after the federal authorization of the vaccine for the 5- to 11-year-old age group.

Children’s National was one of the hospitals that participated in the clinical trial for the newly-authorized Pfizer-BioNTech vaccine for ages 5 to 11. The hospital has been at the forefront of the COVID-19 response—launching the first drive-up testing site for children in the nation.

About 3,100 children ages 5 through 11 have received the vaccine in the trial study so far, and no serious side effects have been detected in the ongoing study, according to a news release from the hospital.

Children’s National will have thousands of shots available in the coming weeks and will start with children who have the highest risk of severe COVID-19 infection.

Vaccines will be given until all families seeking vaccines are served.

 

Children compare band-aids after receiving the COVID-19 vaccine at Children's National Hospital. | Photo: Children's National Hospital
Children compare bandages after receiving the COVID-19 vaccine at Children’s National Hospital. | Photo: Children’s National Hospital

 

“Just like we saw when the adult vaccine rolled out, not everyone will immediately have access to a vaccine, but I am confident that every family who wants this vaccine for their child will be able to get it within the next few weeks now that it’s authorized,” says Claire Boogaard, medical director of the hospital’s vaccine program, in the release.

Bear hugs at Children's National vaccine rollout
Bear hugs at Children’s National vaccine rollout | Photo: Children’s National Hospital

Children’s National Hospital has been proactive in reaching out to the most at-risk patients, providing vaccines in a number of primary and secondary locations so that they will have convenient access with providers who regularly care for their complex needs.

Boogaard says that children who do not have risk factors might find it faster and more convenient to get the COVID-19 vaccine at local pharmacies, health department events or school vaccination clinics.

Children’s National is encouraging all parents to get their children vaccinated as soon as possible. To find locations in the DMV offering the vaccine, visit vaccines.gov.

 

 

 

About Lindsay VanAsdalan

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